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Frequesntly Asked Questions
Gas Burning Units
General Gas Burning Questions - What you need to know about your fireplace, stove, or venting.
Fireplace Odors - What you need to know about your vented and vent free gas stove or gas fireplace.
Remote Controls - Understanding your remote for your gas fireplace.
Vent free gas appliances - Questions about logs, operation, etc.
Pilot Questions - Troubleshooting and maintaining the pilot.

  Wood Burning Units
Understanding Creosote - Why you need to clean your Fireplace and venting.
Wood Burning Questions - What you need to know about your fireplace, stove, or chimney.

General Info
Fireplace Fans - What they do and how you should use them.
General Questions about your Fireplace
Finding an Owners Manual
Identifying Your Unit
General Gas Burning Questions
HOW DO I TURN MY GAS OFF / ON?
By the on/off valve or the wall switch You should also have a gas shut off for each gas appliance usually located in a utility room or basement. This is the best shut off to in an emergency or while doing any repairs.

MY PILOT LIGHT WILL NOT STAY LIT
Bad thermocouple.

WHY CAN’T I GET MY BRAND NEW FIREPLACE TO LIGHT?
Valve might be in off position. Gas is shut off.

WHY DOES MY BRAND NEW FIREPLACE SMELL AND SMOKE?

Needs curing stage up to 6 hours.

MY PILOT LIGHTS BUT THE UNIT DOES NOT

Valve might be in on position. Wall switch may be off.

MY REMOTE DOES NOT WORK.
Check all batteries.

MY CO2 DETECTOR GOES OFF WHEN MY VENT-FREE LOGS ARE BURNING.
The logs may still need cured. Try burning several hours with a fresh air source. If problem persist call for service.

WHY IS MY DIRECT VENT GLASS SO DIRTY AND HOW DO I CLEAN IT AND WHAT DO I USE?
Logs may be placed in wrong position or try adjusting air shutter.

SHOULD I KEEP MY GLASS DOORS OPEN OR CLOSED WHEN I USE MY GAS LOGS?
Open.
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Fireplace odors

When new, it is common for gas fireplaces and gas logs (vented and vent free) to give off an odor during the first several hours of operation. This is common, as paints cure and manufacturing oil needs to burn off the firebox.

It is recommended that you burn your fireplace for at least six (6) hours the first time you use it. If the optional fan kit has been installed, place the fan in the “off” position during this time.  Please ensure your room is well ventilated.  Open all windows. If odor persists, something could be on top of firebox.  Remove top louver, inspect and clean if necessary.

I HAVE HAD MY FIREPLACE FOR AWHILE. I JUST NOTICED AN ODOR THIS SEASON. WHAT IS CAUSING THIS?
Dust, animal hair, and other airborne debris can accumulate behind the fireplace grills, which can lead to an odor when the fireplace gets hot.  By wiping and vacuuming this area and following the burn off procedure, you should eliminate the odors.  Cleaning these open areas should also prevent odors from occurring.

MY VENT FREE FIREPLACE HAS AN ODOR.
Every vent-free burner system will emit an odor or smell. This is due to combustion, which is a harmless odor, which is created when the unit operates. Because of the inherent uniqueness of each installation and the conditions in which it operates, predicting with absolute certainty how any vent-free appliance will operate in a given situation is impossible. In many cases, cracking a window may be necessary. The following are just a few circumstances that can cause additional odors and possible wall discoloration:

  1. Frequent burning of candles or oil lamps
  2. Burning Incense
  3. Painting or staining anywhere in the home
  4. Cements and glues
  5. Carpets and textiles
  6. Pet Odors and Pet dander
  7. Hairspray, aerosols, and cleaning products
  8. Cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke
  9. Air fresheners and potpourri
  10. Fans or drafty conditions that disturb the normal flame pattern
  11. Objects placed in or near the flames
  12. Dirty or improperly cleaned damper / flue / fireplace
  13. Logs improperly positioned on the burner assembly.
  14. Dirty air inlets or pilot assembly (the gas log needs to be serviced and cleaned)
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Remote Controls

What are the main components of the remote control system?

  1. A hand held transmitter. This is similar to a TV remote which allows you to operate various functions of the fireplace.
  2. A receiver (another type).This is located inside or near the fireplace and receives the signal from the hand held transmitter.
  3. Batteries normally power both the transmitter and receiver. Several units only use batteries in the transmitter.

How far away from the fireplace can I be and still turn the fireplace on and off with a remote control?
The maximum distance from which a hand held transmitter will communicate with the receiver is approximately 25 feet. This may vary depending upon interference between the transmitter and the receiver.

What can interfere with the operation of the remote control?
Metal grills or louvers can deflect the signal in a direction that may not be in line with the receiver of your remote control. Interference may cause the remote control to not respond properly to the hand held transmitter. The receiver of the remote should not be installed to the very back of the fireplace. In certain situations, the receiver may need to be located in front of the metal grill or louver of the fireplace.

How long will batteries last in a fireplace remote?
Under normal operating conditions, the batteries should last 6 – 12 months. Make sure to replace the batteries in both the transmitter and the receiver.

How can I avoid accidental operation of the remote control when I am away from home for an extended period of time?
The receiver has a manual switch that can be turned to the off position. It is unnecessary to remove batteries from the remote control. It is a good idea to turn the fireplace pilot off when leaving home for an extended period of time (such as a trip). This will ensure that the fireplace will not be accidentally turned on when you are not home.

The remote is not working. Why?
The following are the top reasons why remotes do not function.

  1. Batteries are weak or are installed incorrectly
  2. Batteries have not been replaced in both transmitter and receiver.
  3. Slide switch on the receiver is not in the correct position.
  4. Interference between the transmitter and the receiver.
  5. Defective component

The remote will not turn off my fireplace. Why?

  1. The slide switch or the on/off switch on the fireplace is not in the correct position.
  2. The remote is in the thermostat mode.
  3. Batteries are old. May work up close and will not work a few feet away
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Direct Vent - Maintaining the vent glass panels
The glass fogs up every time I use my fireplace. Is this normal?
Yes. Water vapor is one of the by-products of combustion, and each time you use your fireplace condensation may form on the glass. It will clear off after a few minutes.

How do I remove the glass for cleaning on my gas direct vent fireplace?
Consult your owner’s manual on how the glass removes on your particular model. On many direct vent fireplaces, the glass is removed by removing the top grill/louver on on the fireplace and folding the lower grill down. Release the two clamps at the bottom of the window frame by pulling down on the clamp handles. Lift off the glass frame.

How do I clean the glass on my direct vent gas fireplace?
Household glass cleaners that do not contain ammonia will work in most cases. (Ammonia based cleaners can cause a milky white haze to be baked on the glass). Specific cleaners for gas direct vent fireplaces such as “White Off” are excellent for more difficult discoloration of the glass. If the glass is extremely discolored; it may be necessary to replace it.

How often should I clean the glass on my gas fireplace?
It is necessary to clean the glass periodically. During initial start-up, condensation, which is normal, forms on the inside of the glass and causes lint, dust and other airborne particles to cling to the glass surface. Also, initial paint curing may deposit a slight film on the glass. All glass should be cleaned after the first 4 to 6 hours of initial burning to remove deposits before they become baked on through further use. After the initial cleaning, glass should be cleaned two or three times during the heating season.

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Direct Vent - Problems with the Flame

Flames turn blue and lift off main burner. Unit goes out within a couple minutes.
Usually a sign of improper venting. Make sure termination cap is installed correctly. Check venting to make sure pipes are connected and sealed properly. Make sure all horizontal venting is level and has no down-slope. Check installation manual to make sure all venting runs follow manufacturer’s guidelines. May need a wind shield around termination cap. Keep the termination cap clear of all debris and snow at all times. Make sure vent cap was installed following manufacturer’s minimum clearances from the ground, roof eaves, shrubs, etc.

Unit burns fine when glass is cracked open but flame turns blue and shuts off after re-installing glass.
A classic sign of improper venting. Exhaust gases are being reintroduced to the combustion zone rather than leaving the vent through the termination cap. Flue gases will not support combustion twice. Firebox is not receiving enough oxygen to support combustion. Check the termination cap for blockage. Check each vent section to ensure a proper seal. Vent pipe may need silicone.

IMPORTANT! Several direct vent fireplaces can be installed in either rear vent or top vent applications. These units are shipped as rear vent units and must be field converted to top vent fireplaces. When changing to top vent, the insulation pad on the top of fireplace must be removed and discarded. Insulation extends beyond the opening in flue outlet at top of unit. Be sure to remove all insulation before completing conversion. See fireplace installation manual for detailed conversion instructions. If the insulation is not completely removed for top vent applications, the insulation may restrict or block the flow of combustion air into the firebox which would result in the gas flame turning blue, lifting off the burner and shutting off.

Flame and pilot blows out in windy weather.
Although termination caps are tested to high wind conditions, gusty or unusual conditions can affect the gas flame. Install a wind shield around the termination cap. Shielding the pilot may also help.

Burner flame is very low.
Is there enough gas pressure? Check gas line to make sure it has no kinks. Do a pressure test on gas line. Check owners manual for minimum and maximum gas inlet and manifold pressures. Make sure unit is set up for the gas you are using.

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Vent free gas appliances

WHAT EXACTLY ARE “VENT-FREE” GAS PRODUCTS?
Vent-free gas products are gas appliances that are designed to be installed and operated without the addition of a vent or chimney. They are intended to supply supplemental heat to a home.  Because there is no vent, flue, or chimney required, all of the heat generated by the product goes directly into the home. That’s why vent-free products are 99 percent energy efficient.

DO THE BUILDING CODES IN MY AREA ALLOW FOR THE INSTALLATION OF VENT-FREE GAS PRODUCTS?
Some building codes do not allow for the operation of vent-free appliances in their jurisdiction. Or my limit the location of a vent free fireplace. Check to make sure you can legally operate a vent-free appliance before you purchase one.

CAN I INSTALL A VENT-FREE PRODUCT ANYWHERE IN MY HOME?
Most building codes do not allow the operation of a vent free appliance in a bedroom or bathroom.

IS A VENT-FREE APPLIANCE SAFE?
A vent free appliance is equipped with a safety pilot and oxygen depletion system. The safety pilot is designed to stop the flow of gas if the pilot flame goes out. The Oxygen Depletion System or O.D.S., is designed to shut down the unit if the oxygen level drops below 18.5%. This is well in advance of a dangerous level, however, homes with any fuel burning appliance should have a carbon monoxide detector installed.

CAN I USE VENT-FREE LOGS IN ANY WOOD-BURNING FIREPLACE?
Vent free logs are certified for installation in the following enclosures;

  1. A masonry fireplace with suitable chimney
  2. A listed factory-built fireplace, assembled with a working chimney, in accordance with the terms of the listing, and not including a label prohibiting use with un-vented gas logs.
  3. A vent free firebox enclosure, tested and certified to accept any approved vent free gas log.
  4. Wood-burning stoves are not tested to allow for conversion to gas burning appliances.

IN AN EXISTING WOOD-BURNING FIREPLACE WITH VENT-FREE LOGS, IN WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES DO I NEED TO USE A HOOD?
A hood is used to allow deeper mantles to be installed at lower heights above the fireplace opening and to reduce wall temperatures above the fireplace opening. Be sure to check the installation manual for specific clearance guidelines.

IF I HAVE A WOOD-BURNING FIREPLACE AND I PUT VENT-FREE GAS LOGS IN IT, CAN I SEAL OFF THE FLUE?
We do not recommend any modification to a wood-burning fireplace, other than closing the flue damper. If the logs give off too much heat or generate an odor, the damper can be slightly opened.

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO TO MY FIREPLACE TO USE A VENT-FREE GAS LOG SET?
The firebox and damper area must be cleaned thoroughly prior to use, especially if your vent-free gas log is installed in a previously used wood-burning fireplace. Failure to do so may result in unwanted odors and wall discoloration.

DO I NEED TO “BREAK-IN” MY VENT-FREE APPLIANCE?
A vent-free gas appliance must be “broken-in” to cure the logs and burn off any oils that were used in the manufacturing process. The “break-in” procedure consists of burning the unit at its highest setting for 5 to 6 consecutive hours, on as many as 3 separate occasions and completely cooled down in between.

Please be advised that it is the law to have properly operating carbon monoxide detectors and smoke detectors in your home. We strongly suggest you have the both in all rooms with a fireplace.

HOW OFTEN DO I NEED TO CLEAN MY VENT FREE APPLIANCE?
A vent-free gas appliance must be cleaned and serviced a minimum of once per year prior to the burning season. Additional cleaning during the season is recommended if the appliance is used heavily, or if it is located in an area of heavy traffic, dust, dirt, or pet hair. Failure to do so may result in unwanted odors, wall discoloration and malfunctions. Regular maintenance and cleaning is the key to years of trouble-free use.

SHOULD I LIMIT THE OPERATION OF MY VENT-FREE APPLIANCE?
A vent-free appliance is not intended to be used as a primary heat source. Vent free gas fireplaces are designed as a convenient, attractive, supplemental heat source. Use your vent free fireplace only to warm the area in which it is located. Never burn your gas fireplace unattended or when nobody is home.

WILL A VENT-FREE APPLIANCE ADD HUMIDITY TO MY HOUSE?
Water is a byproduct of combustion. With a vented fireplace, most moisture escapes out the vent, but with an un-vented appliance it enters the living space. Because humidity levels are usually lower during the winter months, this added humidity is generally welcomed. If your home is tightly insulated, or if you burn the vent-free appliance too often, the excess moisture may condense on cold windows or patio doors.

WHAT’S THAT SMELL?
Every vent-free burner system will emit an odor or smell. This is due to combustion, which is a harmless odor, which is created when the unit operates. Because of the inherent uniqueness of each installation and the conditions in which it operates, predicting with absolute certainty how any vent-free appliance will operate in a given situation is impossible. In many cases, just opening the flue slightly or cracking a window may be necessary. The following are just a few circumstances that can cause additional odors and possible wall discoloration:

  1. Frequent burning of candles or oil lamps
  2. Burning Incense
  3. Painting or staining anywhere in the home
  4. Cements and glues
  5. Carpets and textiles
  6. Pet Odors and Pet dander
  7. Hairspray, aerosols, and cleaning products
  8. Cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke
  9. Air fresheners and potpourri
  10. Fans or drafty conditions that disturb the normal flame pattern
  11. Objects placed in or near the flames
  12. Dirty or improperly cleaned damper / flue / fireplace
  13. Logs improperly positioned on the burner assembly.
  14. Dirty air inlets or pilot assembly (the gas log needs to be serviced and cleaned)

DO I NEED A CO ALARM WHEN I INSTALL A VENT-FREE APPLIANCE?
It is a good idea to install a CO alarm in every home, regardless of the appliance installed.  Home related CO incidents are caused by many sources; some examples are automobiles in attached garages, portable grills or hibachis used indoors, and malfunctioning gas appliances.  Whether vented or un-vented, follow the manufacturer’s instructions, and maintain all gas appliances.

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Pilot questions

LIGHTING PILOT
Check to make sure the gas is connected

Begin by walking the entire gas line from your main line all the way up to the fireplace. It is possible the gas has been shut off further up the line from the fireplace. Be sure the on/off valves are parallel to the gas lines. If the valve handles are perpendicular to the gas line, turn them to the on position. There may be a key valve located either in the floor or wall next to the fireplace. This can be turned on using the gas key. Turn the key in a counter clockwise direction to turn the gas on; turn clockwise to turn the gas off.

If the gas line is new, “bleed” the gas line.

With the shut off valves on, turn the control knob to the pilot position and push in.

Hold control knob in and immediately and continuously press igniter button until all the air is out of the gas line and the pilot ignites. This may take up to 15 minutes for a long gas line run.  Follow the instructions on the next page to light the pilot light.

More detailed pilot lighting instructions are available HERE.

PROBLEMS LIGHTING PILOT
Can’t light pilot with igniter.

Defective push button igniter:

Check electrode and wiring to make sure all is attached. Must have valve control knob in pilot position and fully depressed when igniting pilot.

Pilot will not stay lit:

Make sure to hold control knob in for at least one minute with pilot burning. If pilot does not stay lit, thermal-couple may be bad. Pilot flame needs to engulf the tip of thermal couple (see owners manual). Pilot flame may be too low or pilot head and orifice may be plugged.

Pilot is burning but fireplace will not ignite.
Could be defective wall switch or short in bell wire. If using remote, change batteries in both transmitter and receiver. Check wire connections to wall switch and valve. Make sure valve control knob is set to the "on" position.

CLEANING AND MAINTAINING THE STANDING PILOT
How do I clean the burner and pilot assembly?
It is important to keep the burner and pilot assembly clean. At least once a year the logs and lava rock/ember material should be removed and the burner and control system should be vacuumed and wiped out. Make sure to turn the pilot light off at the gas valve. Vacuum burner compartment especially around orifice primary air openings. Visually inspect the pilot. Brush or blow away any dust or lint accumulation. Refit the logs, embers, and lava rock as per the installation instructions.

Should I turn off the gas pilot during the off-season?
Turning the pilot off during the off-season is better for the appliance. The thermocouple, which monitors the pilot flame, has a limited life expectancy, being in the flame constantly. Turning the pilot off at the end of the fireplace season may prolong the life expectancy of the thermocouple or thermopile. You will also save about 20,000 btu’s of gas per day by turning the pilot off.

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Understanding Creosote

What is creosote?
Wood is never burned completely. The smoke contains some unburned gases and a vapor like fog of unburned tar-like liquids. These condense along the sides of the stove pipes or chimney and become a flammable, crusty build-up called creosote.

Why is creosote a problem?

Creosote presents at least three major problems to the wood burner. Creosote is corrosive to many surfaces, including steel and mortar which are common chimney materials. Creosote build-up acts as an insulating material and reduces the efficiency of your wood stove or fireplace. Finally and most critical, creosote is highly flammable and presents a potential fire hazard.

What factors affect creosote build-up?
Many factors affect the rate and amount of creosote build-up:

  1. Type of wood burned
  2. Amount of moisture in the wood
  3. Type of fire burned
  4. Efficiency of stove. ( One irony of wood burning is that the more efficient your stove or fireplace is in heating the house, the more creosote build-up it generally has. The more inefficient your equipment, the less creosote build-up.)
  5. Location of flue
  6. Type of stove or fireplace
  7. Amount of use

How often should a fireplace be cleaned?
Because of the various factors involved, there isn’t a general answer appropriate to most cases. Most fireplaces require annual cleaning but, each wood burning unit is different. If you notice back-drafting or smoking or losing heat, you certainly check for creosote build-up immediately. Periodic checking is essential for safe efficient wood burning.

How do I check for creosote build-up in my wood stove or fireplace?
Carefully open the damper and, using a flashlight, look up the flue for signs of a build-up along the walls. Goggles are suggested for this. If the build-up is ¼” or more, a cleaning is needed.

Are certain species of firewood unsafe or unsuitable to burn?
No there is no dangerous firewood that we know of. There are woods with sticky sap in their bark and others that can't be split by hand and so are not as desirable as others. But creosote is a product of combustion, not a component of wood. If burned in bright, hot fires, much less creosote is formed from whatever wood is burned uncured firewood can also produce smoky fires. If you have some very dry wood available, mix it with regular firewood to avoid excessive smoke. Burn bright, hot fires. Don't let your fires smolder

In our view no wood species is junk unless it has been painted, treated or is salt-laden from being in the ocean.  Our advice is to try whatever firewood you have available. Make sure the wood is properly seasoned because all wood species burn poorly and produce smoky fires if their moisture content is too high. Extremely dry wood, like kiln-dried lumber.

How can American Heritage Fireplace help me?
We know and understand fireplaces and chimneys and how to clean them. We literally brush your fireplace from floor to roof using tools specifically designed for that purpose. We are professionally trained and fully licensed and insured. (This is important to you) We guarantee a mess-proof job. And, finally, we are a local business. Our roots are here in the community and we take pride in this. If your chimney needs cleaning, then we act like a good neighbor and tell you so. If we think your installation is unsafe, we think you’ll like to know that, too!

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Wood Burning Questions

WHAT CAUSES SMOKE TO FILL UP A ROOM?
Cause: Closed damper, improper draft, chimney too low, negative pressure.

Possible solutions: Raise1 flue, remove exterior obstructions to keep a 10ft. clearance from all flues, install roof top damper, install a mechanical draft inducer.

WHEN I LIGHT MY UP STAIRS FIREPLACE WHY DO I GET SMOKE IN THE BASEMENT?

Cause: Flues are not separated to different heights. Possible leak between flue chambers inside the chimney.

Possible solutions: Raise1 flue, remove exterior obstructions to keep a 10ft. clearance from all flues, install roof top damper, install a mechanical draft inducer. Reline one or both chimneys.

WHY DO I SEE LIGHT BETWEEN MY FLUE PIPE AND FLASHING WHEN I LOOK UP?
This separation between the flue and the flashing is at the point were the flue passes through the flashing. A storm collar is used a few inches higher to deflect the elements to the outside of the flashing.

WHEN I LIGHT A WOOD FIRE WHY DO I GET SMOKE AT THE BEGINNING AND AGAIN WHEN THE FIRE IS DYING OUT?
Cause: The cold air flow of the flue needs to be reversed.

Solution: Try building a hot fire quickly. Add a gas log lighter to pre- warm your flue and start the fire. Close glass doors when the fire is dying down.

WHY DO I GET PUFFS OF SMOKE WHEN I LIGHT MY FIRE?
Cause: Improper drafting

Solution: Try opening a door or window to reduce negative pressure while starting a fire.

WHY DO I HAVE A BAD SMELL COMING FROM MY CHIMNEY & FIREPLACE
Your fireplace/chimney needs cleaning.

MY FIREPLACE BACK DRAFTS
Your fireplace needs oxygen; has improper smoke chamber.

THERE IS A BIRD OR AN ANIMAL STUCK IN MY CHIMNEY WHAT SHOULD I DO?
Call AHF to get it out.

WHAT DO I USE TO CLEAN MY FIREPLACE DOORS OR MY STOVE DOORS?
We sell several different products that can aid with cleaning

SHOULD I KEEP MY GLASS DOORS OPEN OR CLOSED WHEN USING MY WOOD FIREPLACE/STOVE?
A stove door should be closed, a fireplace door should be open.

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Fireplace fans

Can I add a blower to my fireplace?
Many of the gas and wood appliances have an option for a fan kit. It is easily installed, providing that electricity was provided to the fireplace junction box at the time the fireplace was installed and it has louvers on the fireplace.

Why won’t the fan kit turn on right away?

Some of the fan kits have a heat sensor disc. Once the fireplace gets hot enough, the sensor will turn the fan on. Once the fan is on, you can control the fan speed via the speed control. After the fireplace is turned off and cools down, the sensor will automatically turn the fan off.

The fan kit doesn’t seem to blow much air.
Many fan kits have a rheostat control. You can get more air from your fan by making sure the fan control is turned up to a higher fan speed. The rheostat control is normally located behind the lower louver of the fireplace. Fireplace fans are designed to operate at a lower CFM (cubic feet per minute). A high speed fan would tend to cool the air temperature coming out of the top louver and would be noisy. The fan is designed to move warm air into the room, not to move air cross the room.

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General Questions About Your Fireplace

Why does my fireplace smoke?
Flue clogged, Flue not high enough, improperly cured firewood, improper draft due to negative combustion caused by other appliance, room is to air tight, and two fireplace flues fight each other, and on and on…

With so many variables involved, we can't diagnose smoking problems being caused by any single reason. So, if your conventional fireplace smokes, as most of them do, here are the options we recommend:

If it is a masonry fireplace (and some zero clearance), install a fireplace insert with a stainless steel chimney   liner running to the top of the fireplace chimney. Properly installed inserts almost never smoke.

Mechanical draft inducer.

Less expensive options are install glass doors, raise flue, install outside air kit, install roof top damper.

How can I increase the efficiency of my fireplace?

To increase the efficiency of a conventional fireplace, install a fireplace insert. It is the only real way to boost efficiency and cut smoke emissions. Glass doors make almost no difference and accessories like tubular grates that are promoted as efficiency boosters can deliver some heat, but also run the risk of overheating the fireplace and combustibles around it. Conventional fireplaces are for decorative use only and it is unwise to try to use them as heaters.

Will my gas fireplace still work if I lose electricity to my home?
Yes. Gas fireplaces use a standing pilot light. The wall switch to turn the fireplace on or off is hooked up to the gas valve and does not use electricity to operate. In the event of a power outage the appliance will operate and provide heat. If the fireplace has a fan system, the fan will not function during a power outage.

Are gas fireplaces very expensive to operate?
Operating costs will vary by gas utility and by fuel type. Based on national averages, a natural gas fireplace consuming 20,000 BTUs/Hr will cost less than 20 cents/hr to operate. LP units run slightly higher. Your monthly gas bill should include your exact cost per therm (100,000 BTUs).  Based on this rate, and the BTU input rate of your fireplace, you can calculate the cost in your area.

Can I position the gas logs in a different arrangement or use a different log set?
Not on a direct vent or vent free gas fireplace. A gas fireplace is an engineered system that includes the firebox, burner and logs. These items are made to work together as designed by the manufacturer and are tested and listed by AGA or UL. The installation manual has detailed diagrams showing proper log placement.  Changing any of the specifications or placement of the logs could void your manufacturer’s warranty.

Why does my gas fireplace have blue flames?
This is normal for the first few minutes the fireplace is on. If after 30 minutes, the fireplace flame is still blue, you may need to have your fireplace serviced.

Can I adjust the flame on my direct vent fireplace?
Open the lower control panel or louvered grill on your fireplace and locate the gas valve. If the valve has a dial marked "High-Low", rotating the dial will adjust your flame height.

The fireplace makes a “banging” noise when I start it or shut it off. Is that a problem?
Whenever metal heats up or cools down, it expands and contracts. The noise you hear is the normal movement of the metal firebox. It is not a hazard.

The gas logs and glass front soot up. Why?
Usually caused by improper set up of logs. Logs must be positioned as per manufacturer’s instructions. Flames should not be wrapping around logs. Check to make sure lava rock has not been placed on burner and make sure log set does not have too many embers.

I’ve noticed some water in or under the firebox. How do I fix this?
Make sure vent cap is sealed to siding. Use silicone caulk to seal vent termination to house siding.  Make sure vent pipe is horizontal.

I have rust on the inside of my gas fireplace. Is this a problem?
Oxidation is a natural result from the moisture created from the gas combustion process. Surface oxidation can be sanded and re-painted. Installing the optional ceramic fiber brick liner will also cover the existing fireplace walls.

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Finding an Owners Manual

I cannot find my Fireplace Owners Manual?
A new owner’s manual can be downloaded from the appropriate website:

DESA/FMI - http://www.fmifireplace.com/
EIKLOR GAS LOGS - http://www.eiklorflames.com/
ELECTRAFLAME/DIMPLEX - http://www.dimplex.com/consumerhome.asp
EMPIRE - http://www.empirecomfort.com/
FIREPLACE EXTRODINAIR - http://www.fireplacextrordinair.com/
ISOKERN - http://www.isokern.net/
MAJESTIC - http://www.majesticproducts.com/
MASTERFLAME GAS LOGS - http://www.masterflamegaslogs.com/
RAIS WITTUS - http://www.raiswittus.com/index.html
REGENCY - http://www.regency-fire.com/
SCAN FIREPLACES - http://www.warmfurniture.com/page/194
SECURITY FIREPLACES - http://www.securitychimneys.com/pages/fireplace/cat_high.asp?country=us
TEMCO FIREPLACES - http://www.temcofireplaces.com/

FIREGEAR GAS LOGS- http://www.firegearusa.com

 

You will need to know the model number of your fireplace to obtain the correct owners manual.

What kind of fireplace do I have?
Look for labels or tags on or in your fireplace. Double check to see if you have a manual.

How can I find out what brand of fireplace or stove I have? Where can I locate this information on my unit?
Some are located inside the lower louver, underneath bottom of fireplace, some are stamped inside. Inside the opening of the fireplace located behind the hanging screens. It is usually riveted to the side of the screen. Look with a flashlight at all possible locations.

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Identifying your unit
What kind of fireplace do I have?
Look for labels or tags on or in your fireplace. Double check to see if you have a manual.

How can I find out what brand of fireplace or stove I have? Where can I locate this information on my unit?
Some are located inside the lower louver, underneath bottom of fireplace, some are stamped inside. Inside the opening of the fireplace located behind the hanging screens. It is usually riveted to the side of the screen. Look with a flashlight at all possible locations.

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